April is Dig Safe Month


April is DIG SAFE month so I thought I would share some information to help you plan your outdoor Projects.  If you are going to build a deck or fence, plant a tree, install landscape lighting or repair your foundation; before you break ground call Ontario 1 Call at 1-800-400-2255 to request a Locate Service.  Locates are ground markings and sheet drawings identifying and documenting the position of utility lines such as water, gas, phone and hydro.  Make your request 1 to 2 weeks before you plan to start digging to give all the utility companies time to come out and do their part.  Once you have your locates and are ready to begin  remember you still need to dig with care.  Although your utilities are marked other things might not be; such as sprinkler systems, lines to outdoor electrical outlets etc.  Always dig by hand within 1 meter of markings, use a shovel as opposed to a pick and take your time to avoid injury, property damage, disruption of services or expensive repairs.  Locates are free of charge and required by law so in the interest of public safety and accident prevention call first.


Albright Electric is happy to provide a free quote for any projects involving your electrical system.  Outdoor lights & plugs, pools and ponds, garage devices and electrical car charging stations.

For more information


Space Heaters

A Space Heater is a small appliance that plugs into a regular 110 volt electrical outlet and is used to warm a small area or room, as opposed to a central heating system designed to warm a large area or whole building.  Space Heaters are usually used as temporary solutions to add supplemental heat to a particular room where the primary heat source is inadequate such as a basement or a room used by people who are sensitive to cold such as the elderly.   They are not meant to be used to dry clothes, warm a bed or thaw pipes.  Misuse of these appliances can lead to serious injury and fire hazards.

Be safe – General Tips

When purchasing:

  • Choose a space heater with a sensor that shuts the heater off if it overheats or gets tipped over.
  • Also purchase a unit that has a thermostat control as opposed to one with off/on or high/low settings.
  • Read the owner’s manual that comes with your heater and use only as directed by the manufacturer.
  • Look for a label from a recognized testing laboratory such as CSA or UL.

While in use:

  • Check cords and heater to ensure it is in good condition and always plug heater directly into the electrical outlet, never use extension cords or power bars.
  • Do not leave space heaters unattended, always turn it off when you are leaving the room or going to bed.  These heaters are not suitable for use around children or pets.
  • Give space heaters space, keep unit a minimum of 3 feet or 1 meter away from any materials and never place close to doors or open windows.
  • Space heaters are not designed to be used in bathrooms or any place where water is present.

After use:

  • Allow appliance to cool down completely before storing away.
  • Store in space that is clean and dry.
  • Consider replacing any old heaters with new models that have better safety functions.

Alternatively, we recommend that you consider installing a baseboard or convection heater that is mounted on the wall and directly wired into a 220 volt circuit of your home’s electrical system.  That way it is always there when you need it and it is much safer for you and your family.  We at Albright Electric would be happy to assist you in choosing the right type and size of heater to suit your needs.

Call (416) 466-9939 anytime for a free, no obligation quote.

For more information on space heaters

CanadaSafetyCouncil  or this Globe and Mail article


Living with an Invisible Killer

6 Things you should know about Carbon Monoxide:

  1. It is invisible, odorless and tasteless.

A CO detector is the only device that can warn you if Carbon Monoxide is at dangerous levels in your home. You would not know it was there until it was too late, now that’s silent but deadly.

  1. It can come from anywhere.

The exhaust from burning fuels can come  from a variety of everyday items that can be found all over the home or work place. Cars, hot water heaters, furnaces, wood stoves, fireplaces, stoves, barbeques and other home appliances use fuels like natural gas, oil, propane, wood or kerosene that give off Carbon Monoxide.

  1. It’s the law.

Every home is required to have a CO detector installed outside all sleeping areas in the home and on each floor of your home.

  1. The signs are easy to spot.

Signs of Carbon Monoxide poisoning include, but are not limited to symptoms such as  headaches, nausea, dizziness, burning eyes, confusion, drowsiness & loss of consciousness.  Exposure to Carbon Monoxide can make it difficult to think clearly making it difficult to recognize the problem.  CO poisoning can cause brain damage and death.

  1. There are several types of detectors to choose from.

Plug-in, battery operated, hard wired and also in combination with smoke detectors. Generally  the most common detectors installed have been plug in or battery operated and are available at any department or hardware store. Remember to test them at least once a year to make sure they are working right especially if you have the battery type.

  1. Life span, like anything else all CO detectors have an expiry date and have to be replaced.

The life of a CO detector can be 5 years, 7 years or 10 years.  Expiry dates should be printed somewhere on the detector. Feel free to give us a call if you have any questions or concerns.  Our licensed electricians can inspect, and if necessary, replace your Carbon Monoxide detectors and smoke alarms.

Be smart and be safe – install a CO detector in your home today!


For more info www.COsafety.ca


your local fire department

Fire Prevention Week – Checklist


  • Replace any worn out appliances or devices showing signs of age or damage
  • Replace Smoke Detectors every 10 years, replace batteries every year
  • Install interconnected smoke detectors, when one goes off they all go off
  • Install a smoke detector in every bedroom
  • Install a C0 detector in your house. It’s the new law
  • Replace fixtures that do not have a cover over the bulbs especially in closets and other confined spaces
  • Use appliances and devices according to guidelines and instructions
  • Have a licensed electrical contractor do a safety/fire prevention check of your electrical system
  • Hire a qualified, insured & licensed electrical contractor for all electrical installations & repairs


  • Use damaged appliances or devices
  • Overuse extension cords or power bars
  • Ignore signs of a problem
  • Overload your electrical system
  • Use unlicensed workers



For more information on fire Prevention go to Fire Prevention Canada at www.fiprecan.ca

For more information on the Electrical Safety Authority go to www.esasafe.com

Fire Prevention Week – part 3


3, Any electrical wiring or device is only as good as the person who installed it.
Quality workmanship in the installation. service and maintenance of electrical wiring and devices is essential in preventing the potential of electrical fires.

Always use a qualified electrical contractor licensed by The Electrical safety Authority.  While many people are handy, intelligent, skilled, hardworking and caring of others only a licensed electrician/contractor has the specific, complete skill set and experience to perform quality, accurate installation and service of your electrical system and wiring needs.

Take time during Fire Prevention Week to walk through your house inside and out to do an audit of your electrical service, wiring, devices and appliances to ensure your home is up to date, protected and safe.  If you are unsure about anything, call a qualified electrical contractor to come by and do a walk through with you.  For a reasonable fee you will have great peace of mind.

Things to watch out for include but are not limited to, frayed or damaged cords on appliances, use of extension cords and power bars for anything other than temporary use, wires stapled to baseboards or running under carpets, plugs & switches that are discolored or too warm to the touch, fixtures that flicker, blow bulbs too frequently or difficult to remove bulbs, outlets and cords that spark/arc, use of outlets behind furniture, dimming or flickering of power, tripping breakers or blowing fuses, 20 and 30 amp fuses in the panel, more than one wire under a fuse or breaker, fixtures sockets that are discolored or cracked, fixtures with exposed bulbs, plugs and switches that are too close to a water source.

If you have any questions or are concerned about any possible electrical safety issues, Albright Electric is always available to come to your home or business to inspect, and if necessary, make repairs.  Call or email us anytime to arrange an appointment.

You can also find part 1 and part 2 here



For more information on fire Prevention go to Fire Prevention Canada at www.fiprecan.ca

For more information on the Electrical Safety Authority go to www.esasafe.com

Fire Prevention Week – part 2

In Your Walls

2. Connections inside wall plugs and switches can become loose over time and cause electricity to arc as power flows through it.  This can cause overheating, burning of the wires and discolouration of the switch or plug.  This is not only a fire hazard but can also damage or reduce the life of anything plugged into it – especially electronics.  This is more difficult to inspect but if there is any discolouration, or you hear any noise coming from the switch or plug when you turn it on or plug something in – it would be wise to arrange for a licensed electrician to inspect and, if necessary, repair any loose connections.

Connections inside the fuse or breaker panel can also loosen over time which, as above, can cause overheating and possibly damage anything connected to that circuit.  There is a lot of power inside the panel and inspecting, tightening or repairing anything inside the panel should only be done by a qualified licensed electrician.

Albright Electric can inspect, repair or replace any loose or damaged switches and plugs at a very reasonable rate.  Feel free to call us if you have any questions.

Watch for part 3 tomorrow, or link to part 1 here



For more information on fire Prevention go to Fire Prevention Canada at www.fiprecan.ca

For more information on the Electrical Safety Authority go to www.esasafe.com

Fire Prevention Week – part 1

Around Your Home

We are kicking off Fire Prevention Week with a 3 part blog that will help you ease into the colder months with some peace of mind about the electrical safety in and around your home.

Most electrical fires fall into one of three categories

  1. Wiring, electrical devices and appliances that have become old, worn out or outdated.

One of the easiest things to check is the cords on small appliances such as those in the kitchen (blenders, toasters, etc.) and the bedroom or bathroom (hair dryers, curling irons, shavers, etc.).  These cords can become frayed or worn over time and can increase the chance of getting a shock or, if the cord heats up enough, starting a fire.

If you find any worn or frayed cords either replace the cord or, if necessary,  the device or appliance.

Extension cords should only be used for temporary power but often are found behind couches or under area rugs to supply power for lamps and other devices.  This can be hazardous because, once in place, we seldom think of these cords.  An extension cord under a rug may experience greater wear and tear when the rug is walked on and the connection may become loose.  As with worn or frayed cords on small appliances, an extension cord hidden under a rug may heat up or spark – the difference is that it is covered and could start the rug on fire.

Take a little time to make sure your home and family are safe from electrical fires.

Check back for part 2 tomorrow!



For more information on fire Prevention go to Fire Prevention Canada at www.fiprecan.ca

For more information on the Electrical Safety Authority go to www.esasafe.com


Fire Prevention Week

Electrical Safety Blog

October 4th through the 10th is Fire Prevention Week and we at Albright Electric thought it would be the ideal time for the first blog on our website.

Our goal is to provide helpful tips and timely, useful information for our customers.   Some of the topics we’ll be covering in the coming months deal with electrical safety, smoke alarms and the new CO detector laws.

If there are any topics you would like to see covered, please feel free to send us an email with what you would like to know more about.